BALANCING ACT: Yoga teacher Jacque Halsall encourages her students to find emotional alignment through physical alignment.
BALANCING ACT: Yoga teacher Jacque Halsall encourages her students to find emotional alignment through physical alignment. Warren Lynam

Humans: You are what you move on the mat of life

THE yoga mat is a mirror for Jacque Halsall.

"What you see on the yoga mat is a reflection of what's going on in people's lives," she says.

Jacque, of Diddillibah, is a yoga teacher and kinesiolgy practitioner.

She describes her role as facilitating alignment for people in their physical bodies so they can find alignment in their emotional selves.

"I can have someone in a position and by what's going on in their body, I can see there's something not flowing, whether they've told me or not," she said.

"If there's something in their body that's congested, there's something in their life that's congested."

Jacque, 40, used to be a fitness leader but felt she was only helping people with half of their issues.

"I was trying to do it then but it wasn't working," she said.

"People weren't listening. It was all about how you look in the mirror."

Jacque had practised yoga herself since her early 20s, even while working and travelling overseas.

"I did yoga the whole time, wherever I went. It was always there because it's what makes me feel balanced," she said.

When her son, now aged 9, was born, she took time out to train as a yoga teacher.

She draws on Iyengar, a yoga which emphasis detail and precision of alignment, but describes her style as innovative, using props such as blankets and she admits the mat sometimes reflects things to her, as a teacher.

"We're all on the same journey," she said. "There's days when I don't want to go in certain positions because the body isn't ready or there's something I'm trying to avoid. It's about teaching to be in tune with yourself."

When Jacque needs a recharge, she seeks out a healer. Or hits the surf, her "zen".

She grew up on the Sunshine Coast but left for a stint in the city and to travel overseas when she felt it was starting to change.

Coming back last year with her son and six-year-old daughter after her husband got a job was not easy.

She ventures to the coastal strip for shopping and surf but apart from that, finds it "too hectic" and stays in the semi-rural outskirts.

"It's like I need the trees and bush to ground everything," she said. "I need that solitude for people to let go of what they need to let go of."

HUMANS OF THE SUNSHINE COAST

With Janine Hill