WOW FACTOR: Pheobie Walker-Woodrow models wearable art dresses made by Marcia Rickman.
WOW FACTOR: Pheobie Walker-Woodrow models wearable art dresses made by Marcia Rickman. Matt Taylor GLA240518DRESS

AMAZING PICS: See the artwork that has to be worn to WOW

ART doesn't just hang on walls for artist Marica Rickman. 

Her art requires bodies. 

It's the new fashion where the human body is a mere vehicle, a stage and canvas.

For Marcia Rickman the World of Wearable art or WOW is one way of transforming lives.

You may have seen her models at BAM or the Calliope Historical Village Markets.

"I started making wearable art in New Zealand and we got our old people to help make and name some of the costumes," she said.

"As they made the costumes they were talking and using their hands, it was great therapy, I got the bug from there."

Marcia isn't alone.

The WOW movement started in Nelson, New Zealand, at a small gallery that wanted to do "something different".

The festival of wearable art quickly grew so popular it had to be moved to Wellington.

Details of a dress made by Gladstone woman Marcia Rickman.
Details of a dress made by Gladstone woman Marcia Rickman. Matt Taylor GLA240518DRESS

"I remember winning at that show but it literally outgrew Nelson's capacity to host the number of people attending," Marcia said.

Another of her creations is currently being shown at the Mandurah wearable art competition.

"I called it the Paradox of a Woman and it's made of place-mats, pot scrubbers and 1000 washers," she said.

Marcia said the wearable art movement continued to snowball and was becoming very popular at functions and parties.

 

 

"I'm hoping Gladstone will embrace it and we've put out a call to creative people who want to join us," she said.

"I try to use recycled materials and reform them to what I want.

"We're hoping to do an extravaganza show next year."