EAGER: A group of Sunshine Coast women are eager to start a regional competition. Among them are, from back left, Sandi WillittKylie Cook, Katie Foley, Mieke Fortune, front, Leonie Gilbertson, Tammie McCord, Sharna Cushan.
EAGER: A group of Sunshine Coast women are eager to start a regional competition. Among them are, from back left, Sandi WillittKylie Cook, Katie Foley, Mieke Fortune, front, Leonie Gilbertson, Tammie McCord, Sharna Cushan. Contributed

Who said cricket is The Gentleman’s Game?

CRICKET: It’s traditionally known as ‘The Gentleman’s Game’ but like many women on the Sunshine Coast, Sharna Cushan loves cricket.

She takes her two boys to training sessions and games, helps at the local club and enjoys playing on the beach or at the park with friends.

But as it stands, there’s no standalone competition for females. That’s something she’d like to change.

She is among a group pushing for an inaugural Sunshine Coast women’s competition.

“Last year I played in a couple of social games and I asked our president (at Yandina Cricket Club) if there was a women’s comp and he said no,” she said.

“I asked the (Sunshine Coast Cricket) association and they said ‘there’s not actually’ and I said ‘that is really bad.’

“They said if we could get enough interest we could look at putting something together.”

So she started a Facebook page to get expressions of interest for a Twenty20 tournament and it was flooded by prospective players.

Yandina looks like it has a couple of teams ready to go while she said Tewantin was close to garnering a side.

“There’s a fair few people backing us but we have to get more teams...we want Caloundra, Maroochydore, Cooroy.. a couple more clubs to get on board and go from there.”

Even if they don’t get enough sides to get the support of the SCCA, there is still likely to be a competition.

“Through the association would be better but if not Yandina is going to take it on anyway and do six matches over the summer,” she said.

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The competition is designed for women who are keen to have a hit but also for girls who want to develop their skills and potentially earn a spot in the Sunshine Coast Scorchers women’s representative team, which competes against Brisbane outfits.

“What happens at the moment is the young girls play (for local clubs alongside the boys) until about under-14...but then the boys are turning into men and the girls are getting out-numbered,” she said.

“If they’re any good they go to the Scorchers but otherwise there’s nowhere else for them to go so that’s one of the reasons (to start a competition) and it’s (also) for people like me.”

She said cricket was becoming more popular among girls and women particularly with the Women’s National Cricket League being televised for the first time last summer.