TREASURED TRASH: Edward Vaughan pulled this trolley from Noosa River covered in oysters, which he believes could have been in the water for 15 years.
TREASURED TRASH: Edward Vaughan pulled this trolley from Noosa River covered in oysters, which he believes could have been in the water for 15 years. Caitlin Zerafa

Trash turns to accidental habitat

AN OLD shopping trolley dumped in the Noosa River has accidentally become home to thriving organisms after years submerged beneath the water's surface.

Edward Vaughan could not believe his eyes when a neighbour told him she stumbled across something protruding from the water.

When he pulled the shopping trolley onto the bank of Noosa North Shore, it was completely covered in oysters.

"That would have been in there (the) best part of 15 years,” Mr Vaughan said.

While the oysters are now dead, Mr Vaughan believed it would have once done exactly what the Bring back the Fish initiative is working so hard to achieve.

"There is a lot of things going on in the river at the moment with the oysters to feed the fish,” he said.

"I think the oyster program is not great, the tides go out and leave (the bags) dry.”

While he said you can't have a river lined with old shopping trolleys, he believes it could provide an insight into more effective means to attract oysters.

"Obviously they like steel,” he said.

His problem is now to have the rubbish removed by Noosa Council.

"As for this, it's illegal to drop anything in the river.”

Mr Vaughan has lived in Noosa for 21 years and combs the river's shore line every few days in search of rubbish either washed ashore or carelessly dumped.

He said Noosa Council collects his found rubbish once a month but he wants more to be done to keep the area clean.

"I spend hours and hours on the river and I can't get to grips with council,” he said.

Trash or treasure, Mr Vaughan said this is just one of many Noosa River problems he said needs to be addressed.