STEM classes at Noosa District State High School are attracting more girls into this hi-tech field like left to right – Elisabeth Delley, Aidan McGuigan, Grace Hehir, Bianca Grau and Keeley Long.
STEM classes at Noosa District State High School are attracting more girls into this hi-tech field like left to right – Elisabeth Delley, Aidan McGuigan, Grace Hehir, Bianca Grau and Keeley Long.

There’s a science to girl power lab invasion

A Noosa District State High School student is helping to STEM the stereotype of the world of hi-tech being populated by geeky guys.

Bhumisha Lal will be part of the 2020 STEM Girl Power camp alongside passionate biology teacher Karli-Ann Livingstone thanks to the encouragement of NDSHS science head Katrina Holewa.

The camp is held in Brisbane in 2020 from March 24 to March 28 with the goal of to provide female students with uplifting experiences in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Bhumisha will become part of a community of like-minded students, joining only nine other girls from Queensland who are passionate about STEM to experience the World science Festival in Brisbane; meeting role models working in STEM industries and visiting cutting-edge STEM research facilities.

“I had to write 300 words, basically two paragraphs, expressing my interest in STEM. I wrote that the processes involved in STEM underpin our future. It is becoming increasingly important,” Bhumisha said.

Bhumisha’s brother Alpesh Lal, who graduated from NDSHS in 2018, is on a medical career pathway, studying biomedical science with the goal to become a neurosurgeon.

“I will probably end up doing something similar after school,” Bhumisha said.

Bhumisha has this advice for other girls who are interested in careers in STEM … grow self-belief and confidence.

“Try out every opportunity that comes your way. Have faith,” Bhumisha said.

She is also an ambassador for the Tech Girls Movement mentoring initiative.

“I want to be open to new and exciting opportunities and give people the chance to change our future in a positive way.

“I want to encourage other girls to become open to STEM and become more innovative. In many years, many jobs will become unavailable due to advanced technology; jobs that require a high amount of skill, would be the only jobs left for humans.”

Ms Livingstone is excited at the opportunity to lead further girls in STEM experiences at NDSHS, sharing this mantle with head of science Katrina Holewa.

“The STEM girls have a very bright future ahead of them. I am excited to be able to participate in the STEM Girl Power camp,” Ms Livingstone said.