NO BLOCKHEADS: Jurgan Beschorner and Ruth Montgomery take notes at the start of the blocking of The Reluctant Dragon.
NO BLOCKHEADS: Jurgan Beschorner and Ruth Montgomery take notes at the start of the blocking of The Reluctant Dragon. contributed

The blocking stage can be a moving experience

BLOCKING in a stage play is what sponge-cake is to trifle - its very foundation.

It's the time where, scripts in hands, the actors note the moves assigned them by the director to avoid bumping into the furniture and into each other.

For example, a line of dialogue may be delivered by an actor when crossing the stage, or by he/she when sitting down.

The two are inextricably linked and, once decided upon, woe betide any actor who strays from the script.

A delightful example is the classic tale of a rehearsal of an episode of the TV series Till Death Us Do Part.

Warren Mitchell was delivering a punch-line when Dandy Nicholls suddenly moved, from one side of the set to the other, crossing straight in front of him.

Mitchell, a perfectionist and not one to be upstaged, did his "nana” and let fly with a string of abuse.

"You're not supposed to move when I'm saying that line. You were at point A. You're not supposed to cross to Point B. What the hell do you think you were doing, crossing in front of me from A to B?”

Dandy looked at him quite coldly and said: "At Point A I farted. To get away from it, I moved to Point B.”

During the week, some key scenes in The Reluctant Dragon were blocked (without any similar A to B requirements).

Indee newcomer Jurgen Beschorner is playing St George - the elderly, retired, dragon-slayer, while Ruth Montgomery is reprising her role as the vegetarian, crochet-loving, Albert G Dragon.

Finding they have quite a lot in common, St George and Albert team for a couple of quite delightful duets.

Meanwhile, The Indee is looking for an actor, aged between 15 and 50, male or female, to play the lovely cameo role of Wimpy the Village Lamplighter. Contact Carol on 5472 8200.