Bin audits in Noosa to check on recycling habits are upsetting people, according to council candidate David Fletcher.
Bin audits in Noosa to check on recycling habits are upsetting people, according to council candidate David Fletcher.

Taking aim at ‘sneaky’ bin police

The Noosa "bin police" carrying out waste audit checks on household wheelie bins has alienated people, according to Future Noosa candidate David Fletcher.

"I can understand how people felt their privacy was invaded," Mr Fletcher said.

The program entails council officer's examining household garbage contents to check if residents are correctly using the general, recycle and green waste bins.

"This is no way to get community co-operation, because many people feel these inspections are sneaky and disturbing.

"The council needs to improve its techniques to get home-based recycling accepted in the shire," he said.

Mr Fletcher said that since China, Indonesia and other Asian countries began rejecting Australia's domestic waste it has become imperative for communities and households to take more responsibility for their waste.

"It's a major change and our response needs the broad support of the community," he said.

"The council's so-called audit was done the wrong way around. The average person observing a stranger snooping through their garbage will feel their privacy has been invaded.

"The council needed to fully inform people and provide positive information about the purpose of the bin audit and then sought feedback on the process.

"A pilot audit should have been conducted and then further public information offered before the full inspection began."
Mr Fletcher said if Noosa is to adopt best practice in waste disposal, it will have cost implications and involve major changes in how we deal with waste at the household level.

"So let's have a community discussion which will allow the council to shape its response and decide what the best solution is and how much we are prepared to pay for it," he said.

"The council also needs to campaign on reducing single use plastics and establish just how we can reduce commercial and household waste to a point where garbage processing costs and landfill disposal are acceptable.

"Only then will we be able to say that Noosa will be better off and playing its part in achieving a cleaner planet," Mr Fletcher said.