Philip Lee Stickler, 38, was working as a security guard at the Coolum Beach Hotel when he broke the collarbone of a patron.
Philip Lee Stickler, 38, was working as a security guard at the Coolum Beach Hotel when he broke the collarbone of a patron.

Security guard breaks patron’s collarbone at pub

A Coast security guard lost his job after he broke a patron's collarbone while escorting him from a pub, a court heard.

Philip Lee Stickler, 38, was working as a security guard at the Coolum Beach Hotel on May 11 last year when he evicted a 22-year-old patron.

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Crown prosecutor Christopher Cook told the court Stickler saw a patron sitting on a table and asked him to get down.

The patron began arguing with Stickler and turned to finish his drink instead of leaving when requested.

The court heard while Stickler was escorting the patron out of the venue, he then pushed him very forcefully through the door into a wall after his friend tried to intervene.

"In essence, the defendant has behaved excessively, he was heavy-handed in ejecting the complainant from the venue," Mr Cook said.

The court heard when Stickler was being questioned by police whether a broken collarbone was justified, he replied "I don't think anyone should have been hurt".

"He did display some remorse in those conversations with police," Mr Cook said.

"Obviously he didn't deliberately intend to break that man's collarbone but that's what's happened."

Stickler pleaded guilty in Maroochydore District Court on Monday to assault occasioning bodily harm.

Defence lawyer Mark Dixon told the court Stickler had lost his job at the hotel as a result.

A number of character references were submitted on Stickler's behalf saying it was out of character for him.

"My client has indicated both in his interviews and to myself that he is deeply remorseful, particularly given the injury that occurred here," Mr Dixon said.

"He describes having suffered severe anxiety when he attempted to return to work because he no longer felt confident making decisions about how he should proceed with patrons."

Mr Dixon told the court recording a conviction would be of "significant concern" in the new industry he had started working in.

Judge Richard Jones said the victim suffered both physical and emotional damage from the incident.

"The level of force was so severe as to cause a fracture through the lateral end of his left clavicle," he said.

"You clearly used excessive force."

Mr Jones sentenced Stickler to 150 hours of community service within one year.

He was also ordered to pay $1000 in compensation to the victim.

No conviction was recorded.