GO SUSTAINABLE: Tony Haslam and Aimee Dodge in front of the Pelican Christmas Tree at Noosa Civic as part of the #KeepNoosaBeautiful campaign.
GO SUSTAINABLE: Tony Haslam and Aimee Dodge in front of the Pelican Christmas Tree at Noosa Civic as part of the #KeepNoosaBeautiful campaign. Caitlin Zerafa

Reuse to keep Noosa beautiful

YOU'VE probably spotted it, or stopped to take a photo, and while pelicans are somewhat synonymous to Noosa many are probably wondering why there is a giant Christmas tree made of them at Noosa Civic.

Well it is all for a good cause of course.

This Christmas Noosa Civic have teamed up with Noosa Integrated Catchment Association (NICA) to generate awareness about keeping the region's waterways clean.

The campaign is encouraging locals to ditch plastic water bottles and #KeepNoosaBeautiful.

Noosa Civic marketing manager Aimee Dodge said this is their fifth year partnering with NICA and they hope to push that message of sustainability.

"The reusable bottle incentive it to highlight the wastage of plastic bottles and try and encourage the community to reuse and recycle,” Ms Dodge said.

The 500ml aluminium bottles have been designed by local artist Cass Deller and are being sold for $5 at a pop-up store in Noosa Civic. All proceeds go towards NICA's environmental projects.

The eye-catching seven-metre tall tree, which is made of nearly 600 individually sculpted and hand painted pelicans, is also helping raise money.

"We are asking people to take a photo and upload it to Instagram using the hashtag 'Keep Noosa Beautiful'. For every hash tag we will be donating a dollar to NICA,” Ms Dodge said.

"Pelicans are big in Noosa so it aligns with the sustainability cause.”

NICA treasurer Tony Haslam said #KeepNoosaBeautiful in an integral part of the region's Biosphere.

"These sort of promotions are meeting with the functions of the biosphere reserve. They're helping promoting some of the issues people need to be aware of when looking after the environment,” Mr Haslam said.

Australian's spend more than $500million on bottled water each year, and some 370million bottles end up in landfill.

"The drink bottles are really fantastic because it addresses a number of real issues like the containers people use to carry water,” Ms Haslam said.