A feral cat kills a galah.
A feral cat kills a galah.

Noosa to hear of cat-astrophic decline of native species

CATS and national parks are not a good mix and Noosa’s nature-loving pub goers will learn just how they can be best controlled locally by a leading expert.

Professor Sarah Legge of the Australian National University is also a Principal Research Fellow with the University of Queensland and a scientific leader in the Threatened Species Recovery Hub.

She is guest speaker at the Noosa Parks Association’s EnviroForum, Wednesday, October 23 starting at 6.15pm, where “beer meets science” at the Land and Sea Brewery in Noosaville.

More than any other continent, Australia has suffered high rates of species extinction as a result of invasive species.

One of these invasive species is the domestic cat, brought to Australia with the First Fleet. Prof Legge said: “Native mammals have been especially hard-hit and as a result Australia has the worst record of mammal extinction in modern times of any country in the world.

She will describe the options we have for managing cats and their impacts and discuss the opportunities and challenges for improving our management of cats.

EnviroForum spokesperson Brian Young said: “Creating national parks provides a safe environment for all our biodiversity, particularly from human development, but we also need to ensure that our wildlife is protected from invasive species, like cats.

“We are very fortunate to have a nationally recognised scientist like Sarah”.

Come along to learn, participate and meet like- minded people in a fun atmosphere

EVENT DETAILS

When: October 23

Time: 6.15pm to 7.30pm (come early — Happy Hour is from 4pm to 6pm)

Where: Land & Sea Brewery, 19 Venture Drive, Noosaville

Food is available for purchase from the great Land & Sea menu (Wednesday is Wings night!

A $5 contribution per person is welcome. All money collected goes towards the good work of the Noosa Parks Association, including the purchase of land to create national parks to protect our local diversity