GOLDEN CHILD: Seeing Eye Dog foster pup Gilly is being raised by Bob and Helen Dunn, of Bli Bli.
GOLDEN CHILD: Seeing Eye Dog foster pup Gilly is being raised by Bob and Helen Dunn, of Bli Bli. Contributed

New year's resolution comes with fur and waggly tail

COMPARED to the usual new year's resolutions of losing weight, exercising more, or quitting smokes or booze, this one is pretty pleasant.

Vision Australia Seeing Eye Dogs is calling on Queenslanders to make 2017 a year to help others by becoming puppy carers.

Puppy development trainer Brendan Ainsworth said more than 20 pups needed homes in early January.

"By becoming a puppy carer, you can give a person who is blind or has low vision the gift of confidence in their day-to-day life by contributing to the development of a seeing eye dog,” Mr Ainsworth said.

He said carers were needed to look after puppies from eight weeks until they were 12 to 15 months old.

"Being a puppy career is a wonderfully rewarding experience and an invaluable way to make a meaningful contribution to the life of someone in need of a seeing eye dog,” he said.

Bli Bli retireees Helen and Bob Dunn recently became carers of three-month-old golden retriever-labrador cross, Gilly.

"We have always had dogs in the past and we heard about the puppy carer program on the radio,” Ms Dunn said.

"Having just retired, we thought this would be the ideal time to help out in the community - plus he brings us so much joy, not to mention the exercise.

"If you have the time to spend training a pup, it's a lovely thing to do.”

Mr Ainsworth said all food and vet bills were covered by Vision Australia but carers needed to consider their ability to spend time with and socialise the pup. The pups could not be left alone for more than three hours at a time and carers were encourage to take them to work and on outings.

To become a puppy carer, go to seda.visionaustralia.org or call 1800 037 773.