COLD SNAP: Twins Genie and Ada Hearn with Luisa Lobez (middle) at Waterline Espresso   try and keep warm after a week of cold winter mornings.
COLD SNAP: Twins Genie and Ada Hearn with Luisa Lobez (middle) at Waterline Espresso try and keep warm after a week of cold winter mornings. Caitlin Zerafa

Locals rug up after winter temps plummet to single digits

WINTER temperatures were a shock to the system this week as overnight and morning cold snaps had locals digging out beanies and extra blankets.

Friday's temps will range between eight degrees and 21, according to the Bureau of Meteorology, and while we haven't seen record lows meteorologist Jess Gardner said the cold snap was due to a system down south.

"There is a slow moving high pressure system over southern Australia which is directing cold and dry air into the state,” she said.

"This is allowing minimum temperatures to cool down quite low, even for this time of year.”

This week the average minimum temperature recorded at Tewantin was nine degrees. On Thursday we had a low of 8.6 and the coldest morning was on Monday when the temperature plummeted to 5.5 degrees.

These single digits didn't break any records; the coldest July morning on record was set in 1946 when the temperature dropped to -2.2 degrees.

At Waterline Espresso on Gympie Terrace, Luisa Lobez said this week had been "freezing”.

"I get here about quarter past five. It felt about six degrees,” she said.

Keep the winter woollies handy though as the cold weather won't be going anywhere too quickly.

"The cold temperatures will continue for the next few days,” Ms Gardner said.

"Winds will then turn east, north-easterly bringing moisture and cloud coverage and temperatures should warm up.”