Courtney Akrigg of Mental Awareness Foundation with Kaleb and Lucy Mills of Sunshine Butterflies.
Courtney Akrigg of Mental Awareness Foundation with Kaleb and Lucy Mills of Sunshine Butterflies.

Kaleb bravely opens up on living with disability

Pouring his heart out on social media about dealing with disability and waves of anxiety has made Sunshine Butterflies support centre favourite Kaleb an internet celebrity.

Now the 28-year-old's candid admissions, which went viral, have inspired other members attending Sunshine Butterflies' Cooroibah therapy farm called Our Backyard to go online to voice their own mental health challenges.

Happy 10th birthday Sunshine Butterflies

Our Backyard spokeswoman Ali Kelly-McCudden said the centre received an outpouring of positive feedback from Kaleb's post.

"Our community was incredibly moved by his bravery to speak out about mental health and advocate for the disability community," Ms Kelly-McFadden said.

Kaleb's post included some frank admissions.

"Even though I joke around a lot I'm actually really sensitive and I get really anxious sometimes," he wrote.

Kaleb is one of the favourites out at Our Backyard.
Kaleb is one of the favourites out at Our Backyard.

"To feel better I usually go and talk to my friends.

"Seeing my friends at Butterflies and my wonderful carers really makes my day.

"I used to get anxious when I first started at Sunshine Butterflies, but not anymore.

"This is my happy place."

Now Sunshine Butterflies is partnering with the Brisbane-based Mental Awareness Foundation to help spread the message of mental health and wellness in people living with disabilities. They are embarking on a three-month social media campaign showcasing their members talking about their personal mental health journeys and dealing with hardships they've faced.

"We realised we could create huge impact through a campaign like this," Ms Kelly-McFadden said.

The "B-Reel" campaign will focus on personalised stories, of points of view and coping mechanisms.

"We feel this is something that could bring a little light to everyone's lives right now," Sunshine Butterflies community development officer Lucy Mills said.

"Sunshine Butterflies social media platforms provide a great space for us as a community to understand what it's like to live a day in someone else's shoes."

Foundation spokeswoman Courtney Akrigg said when the foundation learned of the social media campaign, it immediately jumped on board offering funding to purchase camera and videography equipment.

The B Real videos will feature online in the coming months on Sunshine Butterflies' Facebook page.