The new 9.7-inch Apple iPad is introduced during an event at Lane Tech College Prep High School on March 27, 2018 in Chicago, Illinois.
The new 9.7-inch Apple iPad is introduced during an event at Lane Tech College Prep High School on March 27, 2018 in Chicago, Illinois.

LEAKED INFO: iPad Mini's rumoured return

AN online leak hints that Apple will release two new iPads in early 2019.

The iPhone-maker plans to launch an iPad Mini and cheaper entry-level iPad by July.

Inside sources revealed Apple's plans to reliable leaker DigiTimes, a Taiwanese website that gleans rumours from Apple's Asian supply chain.

"Apple reportedly plans to launch two entry-level tablets in the first half of 2019," DigiTimes writes.

This includes "a fifth-generation iPad mini and another entry-level iPad model."

The entry-level gadget will be a successor to the 9.7-inch model released last March.

But the iPad Mini will be Apple's first since September 2015 - meaning the series is well overdue an upgrade.

It's so out of date, you can still buy the 7.9-inch iPad Mini 4 for a higher price than the 2018 9.7-inch iPad with Apple Pencil support.

Apple will probably pack a cheaper screen and bolster the processor of the Mini to bring it back down to around the same price as its chunkier tablet.

 

Apple's 2018 iPad Pro tablet added Face ID for the first time, and feature smaller screen borders.
Apple's 2018 iPad Pro tablet added Face ID for the first time, and feature smaller screen borders.

This year is set to be a big one for Apple, with a number of high-tech gadgets on the way.

The iPhone 11 will launch in September, and this year's offering could come with three cameras, according to one industry boffin.

Other insiders think it'll be packed with a "3D camera" that turns the real world into a video game - using revolutionary augmented reality (AR) tech.

A lot is resting on the handset after Apple's value plummeted a staggering £44billion following a shock stock stumble earlier this month.

CEO Tim Cook said 'fewer iPhone upgrades' than expected were to blame, as well as economic turmoil in China.

This article originally appeared on The Sun and was reproduced with permission.