Principals say the dreaded mullet is back in fashion and many are taking steps to ban it on their school grounds.
Principals say the dreaded mullet is back in fashion and many are taking steps to ban it on their school grounds.

Hairdressers support teachers’ ‘bogan’ mullet ban

A Sydney private school headmaster has warned boys sporting mullets they face a trip to the barber if they don't get rid of their 1980s hairdo.

Leading hairdressers have backed Waverley College Deputy Principal Patrick Brennan's missive to students this month telling them the retro cut would not be accepted at school.

"In addition to the correct uniform, students' appearance including hairstyles must be in line with the College expectations from day one," he said.

"The 'mullet' haircut trending at present is not acceptable and students will be directed to the local barber or their preferred hair stylist to rectify any issues."

He is the latest principal who has been forced to explicitly warn boys over their questionable taste in hair.

Wyong Christian Community School told students last year they should save the "zigzag or lightning bolt shaved patterns for holidays" and asked them to "avoid 'the mullet, skullet or frullet' for at least one thousand reasons each."

 

Mullets are back in fashion. Oskar Azar (L) and Alex Theo (R) get their mullets maintained at Barberchino in Newtown. Picture: Toby Zerna
Mullets are back in fashion. Oskar Azar (L) and Alex Theo (R) get their mullets maintained at Barberchino in Newtown. Picture: Toby Zerna

 

Snowy Mountains Grammar School and Bathurst's Scots All Saints College have also explicitly warned students the mullet-cut was banned in the last 12-months.

Celebrity hairdresser Joh Bailey backed the schools' tough stance to eradicate the hairstyle because it was simply a crime against good taste.

"It is important to be well groomed and I don't think mullets are well groomed," he said.

"I don't think they're attractive, I don't think they're flattering and I think they kind of scream bogan."

But the founder of the inaugural Mulletfest event Laura Johnson defended the hairstyle.

"You can't judge a book by its cover, so you shouldn't judge a man by their mullet," she said.

"Just because you have a mullet doesn't mean you're not a down to earth and hardworking Australian."

The event has raised over $40,000 for the Mark Hughes Foundation and this year the Kurri Kurri festival will go national and tour the country celebrating the nation's best mullets across numerous categories following the awards this Saturday.

 

Barber Alex Kardaras from Barberchino in Newtown trims the mullet of Oskar Azar. Picture: Toby Zerna
Barber Alex Kardaras from Barberchino in Newtown trims the mullet of Oskar Azar. Picture: Toby Zerna

Barberchino's apprentice barber Oscar Azar, 16, also backed the style and said young people like himself should be free to wear their mullets with pride.

"I don't see a problem, it is just a hairstyle -what is the difference if it is long or short," he said.

Fellow apprentice Alex Theo said keeping his 60cm mullet clean was a labour of love.

"You have to brush to get all the knots out, it takes about five minutes a day and you have to shampoo it and condition it to keep it smooth," he said.

A spokeswoman for Waverley College said it was not unreasonable for the school to ask students to follow the dress code which included neat hair.

"Part of maturing in life is to know that rules, guidelines, and expectations are necessary for growth - even when these might not align with our personal preferences," she said.

"So while personal expression, fun and creativity are important parts of who we all are as individuals, it needs to fit within the bounds of what is acceptable and required of us. Student hairstyles fit within this principle."

Originally published as Hairdressers support teachers' 'bogan' mullet ban

Participants Zoe and Jaxson Smith are seen during Mulletfestat the Chelmsford Hotel, Kurri Kurri. (AAP Image/Perry Duffin)
Participants Zoe and Jaxson Smith are seen during Mulletfestat the Chelmsford Hotel, Kurri Kurri. (AAP Image/Perry Duffin)