Leap Day Lights
Leap Day Lights

12 photographs celebrate science in the south

Photographers as young as eight years old have submitted their weird and wonderful works to a festival shining a light on the importance of science.

Heath Holden made the top twelve finalists for the Beaker Street Science Photography Prize 2020 with his untitled shot of tiny Tasmanian devil joeys inside their mother's pouch.

The previous 2017 judge's choice award winner said he was privileged to witness scientists checking on the barely 10cm long animals during a University of Tasmania population research trip.

"It's pretty cool to get an insight into what the research entails," he said.

"The photos work as a tool to make people care more about the natural world.

"Photography helps people connect a little bit more, it just gives them a reality check about what's going on in their region."

This year's Beaker Street Festival has focused the photography prize solely on Tasmanian, Southern Ocean and Antarctic images.

 

 

Beaker Street Festival director and founder Dr Margo Adler said six of the finalists were chosen by this year's judge celebrated Tasmanian landscape and wilderness photographer Cameron Blake, while the other half were selected via a Facebook popular vote.

She said this years' online engagement had skyrocketed with 35,000 Facebook votes and 76 total entries.

"When we started the festival the idea was to try to find a whole range of ways to connect with people who maybe normally don't take an interest in science," Dr Adler said.

She said stunning science photography with insightful, detailed captions helped the public appreciate and engage with science.

The peoples' choice award will be decided by visitors to the festival submitting in-person votes.

To book to attend the exhibition from August 22 - September 20 at the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery visit tmag.tas.gov.au

For more festival information visit beakerstreet.com.au

 

annie.mccann@news.com.au

 

 

Originally published as FINALISTS NAMED: 12 photographs celebrate science in the south