BEAUTY: This beautiful butterfly perched itself on baby Aston as he was napping.
BEAUTY: This beautiful butterfly perched itself on baby Aston as he was napping.

EXPLAINED: Why we‘re seeing so many butterflies

YOU don’t have to leave home to have noticed an abundance of butterflies over the recent weeks.

From beautiful yellow, to deep blues, they have been spotted in their thousands fluttering around the Noosa region.

They are a welcome sign of hope and beauty during troubled time, but where have they all come from?

BEAUTY: This beautiful butterfly perched itself on baby Aston as he was napping.
BEAUTY: This beautiful butterfly perched itself on baby Aston as he was napping.

Butterfly Club Queensland president Ross Kendall said it was due to recent drought, followed by heavy rain.

“Partly it’s because of the drought we had,” Mr Kendall said.

“When there is a drought then the vegetation butterflies lay their eggs on shrivel up and the population decreases.”

“The rain we had in January, well the plants spring back to life and the surviving adult females lay their eggs and then the caterpillars munch away and we have the first generation of butterflies.”

BEAUTY: A Blue Tiger butterfly spotted in Noosa. Photo: Angela Farnsworth
BEAUTY: A Blue Tiger butterfly spotted in Noosa. Photo: Angela Farnsworth

Mr Kendall said this has also caused a decrease in wasps and flies, which are common predators to butterflies, allowing the creatures to grow and take flight.

An expert in butterflies and other invertebrates for more than 20 years, Mr Kendall said female butterflies were able to lay up to 500 eggs.

Some of the most common species around are lemon migrant and blue tiger butterflies.

“Some have even been known to land in New Zealand,” he said.

Mr Kendall said the butterflies were luckily to hang around until the colder weather kicks in.