This photo, dated 1948, shows children wearing masks to protect themselves from radiation in the devastated city of Hiroshima nearly three years after the US bombing
This photo, dated 1948, shows children wearing masks to protect themselves from radiation in the devastated city of Hiroshima nearly three years after the US bombing

GRAPHIC: The pics that shocked the world

WARNING: Graphic images

ON AUGUST 6, 1945, an atomic bomb was dropped on the Japanese city of Hiroshima to hasten the end of World War II.

American B-29 bomber Enola Gay dropped its deadly payload, dubbed "Little Boy", over the city at 8.15am local time. The explosion obliterated nearly everything within 10sq km in the downtown area.

Around 140,000 people, or more than half of Hiroshima's population at the time, died. Some died immediately while others succumbed to injuries or radiation-related illnesses weeks, months and years later.

Hiroshima - and the Nagasaki bombing that took place three days later - remain the only use of nuclear weapons in the history of warfare.

Following the bombings, Japan surrendered on September 2, 1945, to Allied forces, officially ending World War II and bringing down the curtain on the costliest conflict in history.

The crew in front of the B29 bomber aeroplane the 'Enola Gay' that dropped the atomic bomb on the Japanese city of Hiroshima during World War II.
The crew in front of the B29 bomber aeroplane the 'Enola Gay' that dropped the atomic bomb on the Japanese city of Hiroshima during World War II.
This photo, dated 1948, shows children wearing masks to protect themselves from radiation in the devastated city of Hiroshima nearly three years after the US bombing
This photo, dated 1948, shows children wearing masks to protect themselves from radiation in the devastated city of Hiroshima nearly three years after the US bombing
Pilot Colonel Paul Tibbets waves before take-off in the Enola Gay.
Pilot Colonel Paul Tibbets waves before take-off in the Enola Gay.
The Enola Gay lands after bombing Hiroshima.
The Enola Gay lands after bombing Hiroshima.
A mushroom cloud over the city of Hiroshima, taken on a reconnaissance plane that flew with US air force bomber Enola Gay that dropped the atomic bomb.
A mushroom cloud over the city of Hiroshima, taken on a reconnaissance plane that flew with US air force bomber Enola Gay that dropped the atomic bomb.
A mushroom cloud over Hiroshima after the atomic bomb is dropped.
A mushroom cloud over Hiroshima after the atomic bomb is dropped.
The shape of a human is seared on the steps of what was once a bank in Hiroshima after the explosion of the atomic bomb in August 1945, Japan. Picture: Universal History Archive
The shape of a human is seared on the steps of what was once a bank in Hiroshima after the explosion of the atomic bomb in August 1945, Japan. Picture: Universal History Archive
The burnt skin of victims days after the atomic bombs which dropped on Hiroshima & Nagasaki.
The burnt skin of victims days after the atomic bombs which dropped on Hiroshima & Nagasaki.
The remains of the Prefectural Industry Promotion Building after the bombing of Hiroshima. Picture: Shigeo Hayahsi
The remains of the Prefectural Industry Promotion Building after the bombing of Hiroshima. Picture: Shigeo Hayahsi
A view of Hiroshima showing the damage to buildings caused by the dropping of the first atomic bomb. Picture: Australian War Memorial.
A view of Hiroshima showing the damage to buildings caused by the dropping of the first atomic bomb. Picture: Australian War Memorial.
A clock recovered from Hiroshima with its hands melted at 8.20, when the blast occurred.
A clock recovered from Hiroshima with its hands melted at 8.20, when the blast occurred.
A Japanese serviceman, who was 1km from the epicentre in Hiroshima, suffered bleeding from skin, red specks, stomatitis and hair loss — even his teeth showed effects of radiation. Picture: Gonichi Kimura.
A Japanese serviceman, who was 1km from the epicentre in Hiroshima, suffered bleeding from skin, red specks, stomatitis and hair loss — even his teeth showed effects of radiation. Picture: Gonichi Kimura.
An allied correspondent stands in a sea of rubble before the shell of a building that once was a movie theatre in Hiroshima on September 8, 45.
An allied correspondent stands in a sea of rubble before the shell of a building that once was a movie theatre in Hiroshima on September 8, 45.
This photo shows a man whose back has been totally burnt during the atomic bomb dropped by the US on Hiroshima.
This photo shows a man whose back has been totally burnt during the atomic bomb dropped by the US on Hiroshima.
This, photo dated August 10, 1945, shows two brothers who survived the atomic bombing of Hiroshima four days earlier.
This, photo dated August 10, 1945, shows two brothers who survived the atomic bombing of Hiroshima four days earlier.
A woman shows scars of from the atomic bomb at Hiroshima. Marks show the pattern of kimono she was wearing with dark coloured material absorbing more radiation and causing deeper burns. Picture: Gonichi Kimura.
A woman shows scars of from the atomic bomb at Hiroshima. Marks show the pattern of kimono she was wearing with dark coloured material absorbing more radiation and causing deeper burns. Picture: Gonichi Kimura.
A Hiroshima Street scene at 10am in the morning on the day the Atomic Bomb was dropped, showing injured civilian survivors on Miyuki Bridge with smoke and fires in the background. Picture: Yoshito Matsushige
A Hiroshima Street scene at 10am in the morning on the day the Atomic Bomb was dropped, showing injured civilian survivors on Miyuki Bridge with smoke and fires in the background. Picture: Yoshito Matsushige
A nuclear bomb victim lies in quarantine on the island of Ninoshima in Hiroshima, Japan, 9,000-meters from the epicentre on August 7, 1945, one day after the bombing by the United States. Picture: Yotsugi Kawahara
A nuclear bomb victim lies in quarantine on the island of Ninoshima in Hiroshima, Japan, 9,000-meters from the epicentre on August 7, 1945, one day after the bombing by the United States. Picture: Yotsugi Kawahara
Shinichi Tetsutani (then 3 years and 11 months old) was riding his tricycle in front of his house when he was badly burned. He died later that night. The child's father donated the tricycle to the Hisroshima Peace Museum.
Shinichi Tetsutani (then 3 years and 11 months old) was riding his tricycle in front of his house when he was badly burned. He died later that night. The child's father donated the tricycle to the Hisroshima Peace Museum.
Victims shelter in a makeshift tent hospital at the banks of the Ota River in Hiroshima.
Victims shelter in a makeshift tent hospital at the banks of the Ota River in Hiroshima.
Three Japanese women pray over a mountain of bones left after the atomic bomb.
Three Japanese women pray over a mountain of bones left after the atomic bomb.