MARINE BIOLOGISTS: Children will experience hands-on experience with marine animals at the Marine Biologist for a Day school holiday workshop.
MARINE BIOLOGISTS: Children will experience hands-on experience with marine animals at the Marine Biologist for a Day school holiday workshop.

Chance to channel your inner marine biologist

OCEAN-loving kids and aspiring marine biologists will be given the opportunity to dive below the surface during an intensive school holiday workshop.

The Marine Biologist for a Day program is designed to give students a deeper understanding of ocean science than they would get at school.

Separate full-day workshops, presented by Ocean Life Education, have been tailored for primary and high school students with a passion for the sea.

Presenter Richard Coward, a marine ecologist and former Underwater World curator, said kids would get in-depth knowledge and hands-on learning.

The primary school workshop answers curious questions like ‘Which animal throws its stomach through its mouth to eat’ and ‘How many teeth does a shark have?’

Children will be able to touch different shark jaws while learning about common misconceptions about the predator, and stroke sea stars and other touch tank animals.

MARINE BIOLOGISTS: Rowan Kennedy, Breanna Coward and Imogen Mollee examine shark jaws and learn common misconceptions about the predators as they become marine biologists for a day.
MARINE BIOLOGISTS: Rowan Kennedy, Breanna Coward and Imogen Mollee examine shark jaws and learn common misconceptions about the predators as they become marine biologists for a day.

The high school workshop is slanted towards students considering a career in marine biology and include topics like fish adaptations, dangerous marine animals, shark ecology, echinoderm classification and much more.

Students will also be part of a mullet dissection and learn about career options.

Mr Coward said students of all ages would be taught about human impacts on the ocean environment and how to make a positive change.

“A huge percentage of the population lives near coastal areas and people love going to the beach which is why it is important to learn about the marine environment,” he said.

“One of the biggest impacts is plastic pollution - it upsets animals and turtles - and microplastics which are ending up everywhere and in everything.

“We explain the problems and talk about how we can change our lives and lifestyles and the fact this is achievable.”

Senior Marine Biologist For a Day for high school students will be held December 11 while the Marine Biologist For a Day – Junior (ages 7 – 12) is December 16 in Buderim from 9am to 2.30pm.

Cost is $85 and classes are capped at 25 people. To register visit www.oceanlifeeducation.com.au/programs/marine-biologist-for-a-day.