ON A MISSION: River rangers David Lewis, Dennis Heavey, Roger Kelly and John Martin with a small part of the Clean Up haul from Noosa River.
ON A MISSION: River rangers David Lewis, Dennis Heavey, Roger Kelly and John Martin with a small part of the Clean Up haul from Noosa River. Alan Lander

Anglers' attitude angers Clean Up

THE amount of cast-off or lost fishing lines, lures, nets and abandoned crab pots had Clean Up Australia Day volunteers and river rangers at Noosa River annoyed on Sunday.

Amidst the tyres, chairs, bottles, cans, plastic debris, even a set of BMW car keys - with spare attached - the big message emanating from the foreshore clean-ups, the kayak and boat operators, and the divers who searched the riverbed was either boaties and anglers did not know how to stow their equipment away properly - or just couldn't care less.

Noosa Integrated Catchment Association chair Peter Hunnam said the volunteer turnout was good for the river clean-up, and a further 20 sites across the shire were working to remove rubbish from land and sea, from Boreen Point to Peregian, and 10-15 skips had been donated by Cleanaway to capture the haul.

"Bait bags are the worst plastic item, along with fishing lines,” Mr Hunnam said.

"The lines sometimes tangle, and they're just cut away. The impact on fish and wildlife is incredible.”

Mr Hunnam said the details this year's clean-up was being recorded in order to source the various materials discovered.

"We are sorting it where we can work out where it's coming from, to see if we can stop it at the source,” he said.

"Working with Boomerang Alliance, we can target businesses who use the material and see if we can change their ways.”

Former NICA head Tony Haslam said some boaties and anglers didn't seem to care about the damage they were causing.

"Others are not paying attention,” he said, as they let their gear be swept away into the waters,” Mr Haslam said.

"We are also finding cast-off fishing lines around rocks; the lures are still operation so fish are getting caught, and dying on the lines. And the lines don't break down.”

Divers found the same story on the riverbed.

"There's a lot of tangled lines,” said Liam Pruss, who dived with Emma Pruss.